Slide 1
Putting the Berlin Principle
into Practice
The Southampton Keystroke Policy

Berlin Declaration on
Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities
http://www.zim.mpg.de/openaccess-berlin/berlindeclaration.html
Here are its pertinent passages, distilling the essence
[while flagging the points that are still too vague/ambiguous
for a practical, concrete implementation]
“Open access [means]:
“1. free... [online, full-text] access [to what?]
“2. A complete version of the [open-access] work [ = what?] ... is deposited... in at least one online repository... to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, [OAI-] interoperability, and long-term archiving.
“[W]e intend to... encourag[e]… our researchers/grant recipients to
publish [?] their work [?] according to the principles [?]... of the open
 access paradigm [?] .”

Slide 4
Open Access
What?
To What?
Why?
How?

Open Access: What?
Free,
Immediate
Permanent
Full-Text
On-Line
Access

Open Access: To What?
2.5 million annual research articles
In 24,000
peer-reviewed
journals (conferences)

Open Access: To What?
ESSENTIAL:
to all 2.5 million annual research articles
published in all 24,000 peer-reviewed  journals (or conferences) in all scholarly and scientific disciplines, worldwide

Open Access:
Why?

Open Access: Why?
To maximise:
research visibility
research usage
research uptake
research impact
research progress
By maximising:
research access

The objective of open-access self-archiving
(and what will persuade researchers to provide it)
is not to quarrel with, ruin or replace journals, publishers or peer review  (at all)
        (Self-archiving is a supplement to, not a substitute for journal publication; it is done for the sake of providing access to all would-be research-users worldwide whose institutions cannot afford the publisher’s official version.)
nor will researchers be persuaded to self-archive for the sake of  providing access to teachers - students - the general public (and yet that will come with the territory…)
nor will researchers be persuaded to self-archive for the sake of providing access to the Developing World (and yet that will come with the  territory …)
nor will researchers be persuaded to self-archive for the sake of providing access to medical information for tax-payers (and yet that will come with the territory …)
nor will researchers be persuaded to self-archive for the sake of making all knowledge/information free (and yet some of that will come with the territory…)
nor will researchers be persuaded to self-archive for the sake of relieving the budgetary problems of libraries (and yet some relief for access needs that exceed the budget will come with the territory…)

Slide 12
Slide 13
Quo usque tandem patientia nostra…?

How long will we go on letting our cumulative
daily/monthly/yearly research-impact losses grow,
now that the online medium has at last made this all preventable?
Open Access: How?
Deposit all institutional research article output
In institutional OAI-compliant repositories

Open Access: How Not:
 Archives without an institutional self-archiving policy
(near empty, in some cases for several years)
Slide 17
Even the fastest-growing archive, the Physics ArXiv, is still only growing linearly (since 1991):
Open Access: How:
Two archives with an institutional self-archiving policy
Southampton Department of Electronic and Computer Science (since 2002)
and Southampton University (since 2004)
More archives with institutional self-archiving policies:
Max-Planck Institute (Edoc) (Germany), Physics ArXiv (USA),
University of Amsterdam (Netherlands), Lund University (Sweden)
The author/institutional self-archived version
is a supplement to -- not a substitute for --
the publisher’s official version
Link the self-archived author/institution supplement to the publisher’s official website
Pool and credit download counts for the self-archived supplement with downloads counts for the official published version
(All citation counts of course accrue to the official published version)

Slide 22
Slide 23
For at least 10 years now,
keystrokes have been the only barrier to 100% Open Access
Hence what is now needed is an
 institutional keystroke policy.

The Southampton Bureaucratic “Keystroke” Policy:
The keystrokes for depositing the metadata and full text of all Southampton research article output need to be performed (not necessarily by you)
For institutional record-keeping and performance evaluation purposes
Otherwise your research productivity is invisible to the university (and RAE) bureaucracy

Southampton Bureaucratic
“Keystroke” Policy:
The Nth (OA) Keystroke
Slide 27
Dual Open-Access Strategy
Berlin Declaration
on
Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities

http://www.zim.mpg.de/openaccess-berlin/berlindeclaration.html
The pertinent passages (updated in green):
“Open access [means]:
“1. immediate free... [online, full-text] access to published research articles
“2. A complete version of every search article... is deposited...
        in at least one online repository... to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, [OAI] interoperability, and long-term archiving.
“[W]e intend to... (1) require... our researchers/grant recipients to
   self-archive all their research articles in our own institutional repository and to (2) encourage them to  make them... open access.”

Otherwise:
Berlin 4,5,6,7,8,9…?
Registry of
Institutional Open Access Provision Policies
 http://www.eprints.org/signup/sign.php
Universities and research institutions who officially commit themselves to implementing the Berlin Declaration by adopting a systematic institutional self-archiving policy for their own peer-reviewed research output are invited to describe their policy in this Registry so that other institutions can follow their example. Self-archive unto others as ye would have them self-archive unto you…
Institution                                               OA Archive(s)                                                 OA Policy
Institut Jean Nicod, CNRS, France                               http://jeannicod.ccsd.cnrs.fr/                                Policy
Institut Nat. de la Rech. Agronomique (INRA), France  http://phy043.tours.inra.fr:8080/                       Policy
Institute for Science Networking Oldenburg             http://www.isn-oldenburg.de/publications.html    Policy
Queensland Univ. Technology, Brisbane, Australia      http://eprints.qut.edu.au/                                     Policy
Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology             http://202.88.236.215:80/oai/oai2.php                Policy
Southampton Univ. Electronics/Computer Science      http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/                              Policy
Universidade do Minho, Portugal                              https://repositorium.sdum.uminho.pt                    Policy
Universitaet Hamburg, Germany             http://www.rrz.uni-hamburg.de/FZH/archiv.html  Policy
University of Southamptpon, UK                              http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/                       Policy